How one toxic bunny vibrator made me a body-safe sex toy enthusiast

Nov 30 , 2021 by Team Konfettie

Have you ever used a sex toy? Or are you on the verge of buying a new one? Maybe even your first toy ever? Then pay attention because your sex toys might be harmful to your body.

I vividly remember the first sex toy I got. It was a gift from a friend. Apparently, at her office, they had boxes full of rabbit vibrators. So many that they were allowed to hand them out. Why did my friend's company have them beat me? Their company was not even operating in the sex toy business. It was probably a freebie offered by magazines that targeted women. Either way, I got one in turquoise YAY! I felt like such an adult at 19.

The only reason I got a sex toy at that age is that that was the age I was when moving out of my parent's home. I could not cope with the fact that they might find it, hence the waiting. If you don't want to wait to buy sex toys till you move out of your parent's home, read our blog called 'Help! My parents found my sex toys. 

 

Besides feeling excited because I finally owned an actual sex toy, I remember that I was welcomed by an intense smell of plastic when I opened the box. At the time, I did not think anything of it other than thinking; This smells like a brand new toy.

 

This can not possibly harm a person. Why would a company sell products that you insert in your body but are toxic? This can simply not be the case. I live in Europe, there are rules and regulations for everything.

 

After using the bunny, I noticed that it was not easy to clean the vibrator. And after leaving it out on my nightstand, it would collect a lot of dust and adopt a dull color. The bunny rabbit had Swiffer skills! 

 

The toy was made from jelly material. It felt pretty good, mainly soft and quishy. 

 

A couple of years passed before I discovered that jelly substances used in sex toys can be toxic and/or porous. However, even after reading about that, I occasionally used the toy as I could not believe that the EU would allow people to use toxic materials as sex toys. So throwing it away would be a waste, right?  

 

Can I say for sure that my first sex toy was toxic? Not really, as I do not have the box anymore. But I am 100% sure it was made from jelly, making it a porous toy. These types of toys can harbor bacteria. You can never really clean them, which increases the risk of contracting an infection. 

 

Through the years, I bought some other toys that were focused on clitoral stimulation and not penetration. Occasionally, ok...when drunk, I would whip out the possibly toxic and porous toy. Afterward, I would always clean it under the faucet before putting it back in my sex toy box. But, of course, we all have one, don't we? 

 In hindsight, grabbing my first toy during drunk hours was not the best decision. Just look at this Reddit post below. Someone got chemical burns because she used a non-body-safe toy. Yikes! 

 reddit-comment-chemical-burns-after-using-sex-toys.

A report by the name 'Regulations on the sex toy industry in Europe' released February 2021 by Technium Social Sciences Journal states that 'Regardless of increases fame of sex items, there are no rules and regulations on them.' So even though more and more people are experimenting with sex toys, the industry stays unregulated. 


A spokeswoman of the UK Independence Party by Jane Collins, said that 'if someone is mature enough to visit a sex shop for authorized buying, then the person should be permitted to decide for herself if they are going to be terrified by possible health dangers. In other words: it's your responsibility.  

This seems to be the nature of the conversation. But how can people take responsibility for something they are not aware of? And isn't it in the interest of public safety if more people knew about toxic sex toys? Or even better, learn about the body-safe alternatives? 

Even after reports showing that materials like PVC and 'jelly plastics' contain substantial amounts of toxic chemicals and that these toxins can even pass through the skin, no one seems to take responsibility for this. Read more about toxic and porous materials in our blog called: Read this if you want to learn how to safely use the right type of sex toys. 

In addition, because the sex toy market is unregulated, anyone can sell just about anything and call it what they want. As a result, many sellers and resellers use the term body-safe without being body-safe at all. Just for marketing purposes. Buying a sex toy that has 'body-safe on the package does not guarantee it's 100% body-safe. Confusing right?

 

Baffled as I was, I dug a bit deeper and found out that not everyone in the sex toy industry is focusing on using the usual cheap, toxic, and porous materials. Instead, there are plenty of small business owners who are designing sex toys that are body-safe. 

 

Why did these people start an adult business? Mainly because they missed an adult product or sex toy themselves and decided to create the product of their own desires themselves. How's that for taking matters into your own hands, Jane?

 

A great example is Neotori, a German company that creates handmade body-safe fantasy dildos. Under the guise of: "If you can't get it, make it yourself," they decided to stop searching for body-safe toys and started creating. Want to read more about Neotori? Check out their story in our blog called: The 3 people behind the fascinating body-safe fantasy sex toys from Germany.

 

There might be some more good news! A total of twelve countries are currently working on an ISO standard called:  ISO/PC 325 Sex toys. Design and safety requirements for products in direct contact with genitalia, the anus, or both. It is said that the focus of this ISO standard is on safety and user information relating to the materials and design for manufactured products intended for sexual use.  

While this ISO standard will not ban toxic materials, it could be the start of more standards being set for the sex toy industry. 

sex-toy-testers-and-bloggers.

 Also, with the rise of sex toy testers, the public is becoming more aware of possible health dangers. Via blogs and social media, people like Dangerous Lily, Tess Tesst (Dutch), Miss poppie (Belgian), and Hey Epiphora are making a difference by writing brutally honest reviews about sex toys and the sex toy industry. 


Did I throw away my 'bunny'Yes! I finally decided that I did not want any toxins in my pussy!  


I want to take care of my body, and therefore choosing body-safe sex toys is the only logical option. But do you think body-safe sex toys are boring? Think again! 


Many extraordinary small businesses are producing the most trendy body-safe sex toys. Companies that care about your health. They want to provide you with the best experience while maintaining a body-safe standard themselves.


Together they are positively changing the sex toy industry.  


 Are you ready to throw out your toxic and porous toys? 

 

Note: The bunny rabbit vibrator shown in the image is made from ABS plastic and TPR. Konfettie considers toys made from TPR non-body-safe as they are porous. However, this does not mean all rabbit vibrators are non-body-safe. Read the label before you purchase a sex toy. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

How one toxic bunny vibrator made me a body-safe sex toy enthusiast